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Your road to data-driven decisions

Many highway authorities routinely measure skid resistance on their key routes and carry out targeted improvements to reduce the risk of collisions. Typically, decisions about when and where to invest are guided by the research and approaches taken for national road networks. For local authorities, whose roads have different geometries, junction types, traffic speeds and traffic flow, the lack of evidence to support a risk-based approach poses a challenge for the effective management of their networks.

Our research attempts to understand the link between skid resistance and collision risk on local roads. We have analysed data from 11 authorities and propose new thresholds and decision-making frameworks to support prioritisation of maintenance funding. If proven through trials, it will facilitate improved outcomes for road users and tax payers by targeting the locations that deliver the greatest safety benefits from skid resistance treatments.

To find out more about the project, our research and how you can get involved please email enquiries@lasr-approach.org


LATEST NEWS:

The LASR Approach named WINNER of the Road User Experience Award at Strictly Highways 21.

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Initial Research Report released on The LASR Approach

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Watch the video

What is The LASR Approach?

Take a closer look as Kully Boden and Dr Helen Viner present our latest research as we reach a significant milestone in our journey.

The LASR Approach has been shared with:

> XAIS Asset Management/RSTA Skid User Group

> Midlands Highway Alliance / Midland Service Improvement Groups

  • Highways Asset Management Sub Group
  • Traffic Signals Sub Group
  • Casualty Reduction Sub Group

> Highways Magazine

> CIHT Magazine (with peer review)

> Future Highways Research Group

> CIPFA HAMP Network x 3 regional events

> RSTA Asset Management Group

> Strictly Highways Conference

> LinkedIn Users / Followers

Industry Recognition

Project Collaborators

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